• Budget 2017: Schools to get £600 for extra A-level maths pupils
    Schools and colleges will get £600 for every extra pupil who studies maths at A-level under a proposal due to be set out in tomorrow’s budget. According to the Daily Telegraph, the chancellor of the exchequer, Philip Hammond, will announce the £177 million incentive tomorrow as part of a raft ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-21
  • Schools not up to the job of finding places for excluded pupils, warns academic
    Most schools are not in the “best position” to find alternative provision for their excluded pupils, a leading academic has warned. David Berridge, a professor of child and family welfare at the University of Bristol, told MPs today that it was difficult for individual schools to know about the “range ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-21
  • Church schools accused of ‘discriminatory’ admissions
    Church of England schools have failed to stamp out “inappropriate” and “damaging” discriminatory admissions policies, according to a new report. The report, published by the Accord Coalition for Inclusive Education on behalf of the Fair Admissions Campaign, accuses the Church of “misselling its schools to the public” by presenting them ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-21
  • Three in ten vocational qualification tests fail Ofqual standards
    Nearly a third of the tests of technical qualifications taught in schools have failed to reach Ofqual’s standards. Of the 49 tests that measure the 27 qualifications reviewed by Ofqual, 14 do not give a trustworthy reflection of pupil performance, a failure rate of 29 per cent. The qualifications, which ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-21
  • What will the 2017 autumn budget have in store for schools?
    Recent estimates on the health of public finances have been better than expected indeed July this year witnessed the first government surplus since 2002. Nevertheless, over the medium term the uncertainty of Brexit looms large. A significant downgrading in the OBR’s forecast could lead to a further tightening of the ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-21
  • Girls better at working together than boys, PISA study finds
    Girls outperform boys when it comes to working together in school, according to a PISA study, which identified an above-average gender gap in the UK. PISA’s collaborative problem-solving study involved 125,000 15-year-olds in 52 countries, including 32 of the 35 members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-21
  • David Benson, Principal, Kensington Aldridge Academy
    This isn’t supposed to be a story about Grenfell Tower. It’s supposed to be the story of David Benson, a poster boy for the Teach First mission, who eschewed his high-flying Cambridge-educated family’s vision of him as a lawyer, academic or media guru, and instead worked for over a decade ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-21
  • Grammar school establishes ‘unsafe space’ for sexism and gender discussions
    The grammar school in Kent that was criticised last year for inviting alt-right media personality Milo Yiannopoulos to address its pupils has created an “unsafe space” where its older students can discuss issues relating to sexism and gender without being “criticised for the wrong use of language”. Simon Langton Grammar ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-20
  • Government faces legal action on pupil nationality data
    A campaign group is raising money to take the Department for Education to the High Court over its decision to collect data on school pupils’ nationality and country of birth. The human rights charity Liberty will represent Against Borders for Children, which will focus on whether the policy infringes the rights ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-20
  • Budget 2017: £100m National Centre for Computing to train 8,000 new teachers
    The government will train 8,000 extra computer science teachers at a new £100 million National Centre for Computing, Philip Hammond is expected to announce this week. In Wednesday’s budget, the chancellor will set out his vision for a “hi-tech Britain”, and acknowledge the need to train more teachers in computer science. ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-20
  • Leading MATs have far more pupils with English as additional language
    The largest multi-academy trusts have far more pupils with English as an additional language – and could be benefiting from having more children who are “easier” to progress. Researchers have identified 13 academy trusts responsible for 12,000 pupils or more, which are dubbed “system leaders” under a new system used ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-20
  • Pupils on ‘SEN support’ fare worse than pupils with EHCPs
    Pupils with special needs have better outcomes if they have an education health and care plan (EHCP) or statement – but those without statements are being let down, Ofsted has warned. Children categorised as needing “SEN support” are more likely to have their needs overlooked, be excluded, and achieve less ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-20
  • Six steps to create good volunteering programmes
    In preparation for #Iwillweek, Professor Tristram Hooley discusses the evidence on young people’s volunteering Young people are motivated by doing something to help others, to improve their community or to provide support for those less fortunate than themselves. Because of this lots of schools make opportunities available to young people ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-20
  • Performance-related pay will solve teacher retention crisis
    To keep talented teachers from quitting, you have to pay them according to how well they do, says Lee Miller In almost all walks of life, employees are rewarded for excellent work. It motivates them to stay with their employer and continue to perform well, which in theory, leads to ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-20
  • British Council: Arabic must be taught in schools
    Arabic is one of the top languages the British Council wants pupils to learn, even though just five per cent of schools in England teach it. New research identifies it as the fourth most important language for future job opportunities, after Spanish, Mandarin and French. But unlike the many secondary ... read more
    Source: Schools WeekPublished on 2017-11-19